Submission to God makes you free

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Imagine a six year old child playing near a railroad track. Soon, a train passes by and the child continues playing, utterly ignoring the train passing by only a meter away. His knowledge that a train travels only on its tracks that it will not diverge and possibly hit him, gives him a sense of confidence and safety.

Now, let’s replace this child with somebody from the past, somebody unaware of a train’s existence. Even the most courageous legendary people like Hercules would feel threatened and fearful at the sight of a   humongous vehicle coming so close at lightning speed and with roaring sound. Their fear would force them to escape a long distance away from the train.

So… what makes this six year old child so free and immune to the threats of the train? What gives him the liberty to continue playing instead of being forced to escape like the most courageous people of the past? What makes those brave people fearful, taking their freedom away and forcing them to flee?

The difference is that the child believes this train has an owner, one that controls it. He knows that there is an order to this; that the train is not traveling randomly in any direction. It cannot diverge from its tracks. As for those of the past, they are not aware of the order. They believe the train is in charge of itself and not confined to its tracks.

Similarly, the more we submit ourselves to God, the stronger our faith grows. We understand that everything in this universe has an Owner. Nothing can harm you without the permission of God. Knowing that we are in safe hands gives us freedom from worry and  fear. (see [1] and [2])

Essentially, submitting to God makes us free. Refusing to submit makes us prisoners.


Relevant Passage from the Sixth Word:

Also, to sell me is to become a soldier to me and act in my name. In the place of an ordinary prisoner and irregular soldier, you will become a special [and] free military officer of a grand sultan.


Source

Hutbe-i Şamiye, Arabi Hutbe-i Şamiyen’nin Zeylinin Kısa Bir Tercümesi

Tarihçe-i Hayat, Birinci Kısım İlk Hayatı

 

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